Get Off Medications

Fuhrman
America is the most medicated nation on Earth. Department of Health and Human Services data shows that at least half of all Americans take at least one prescription drug, with one in six taking three or more medications. Prescription drug use is rising among people of all ages, and use increases with age. Five out of six persons 65 and older are taking at least one medication. Prescriptions for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antidepressants, blood glucose/sugar regulators and cholesterol-lowering statin drugs, in particular increased notably between 1996 and 2002. Prescription drugs are the fastest growing health expenditure; costs have risen at least 15 % every year since 1998. (1)

The safest and surest way to good health is to follow the recommendations in my book, Eat to Live. The key to a tragedy free, long life is nutritional excellence, satisfying relationships and exercise, not medication. Don’t gamble your health on risky medications. The Eat to Live diet has enabled people to reduce or eliminate dependence on a variety of medications including insulin, blood pressure, antidepressants and cholesterol lowering medications. The false sense of security provided by these medications enables patients to continue the same disease causing diet and lifestyle that led to the problem.

My mantra is “don’t treat or control your medical problem, get rid of it.” My goal on this website is to give you information so you can take back control of your health future and recognize that the answer to a long disease free life will not come from a pharmacy company or from your typical doctor. It will come from an understanding that when you supply the body with the prerequisites of optimal health (superior nutrition, avoidance of excesses, elimination of deficiencies, exercise, satisfying relationships and adequate light), and remove the stressors that cause disease, the miraculous self-healing properties of the body will be given free reign and you will be able to sustain excellent health into your later years.

1. Health, United States 2004. 28th report on the health status of the nation submitted by the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services to the President and Congress. Compiled by the National Center for Health Statistics and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Protein Content of Green Vegetables Compared to Meat?

Fuhrman

Some have inquired about further data and sources, in the listing of the protein content of green vegetables compared to red meat in Eat To Live, so more complete data is posted here.

In the chart below, an equal caloric amount (100 calories) of porterhouse steak is compared to broccoli, romaine lettuce and kale. Broccoli provides the greatest amount of protein per calorie.

Green vegetables are all rich in protein, and relatively low in calories. They provide generous amounts of most micronutrients with no cholesterol and virtually no fat. Meat on the other hand, is relatively low in micronutrients. Remember whole grains, beans and seeds are also high in protein and should be utilized to achieve adequate protein on a diet with no or minimal animal products. But the point in this example was to illustrate how weight-loss favorable green vegetables are and that no matter how many green vegetables you eat, you still cannot take in too many calories. If you fill up on greens, they will reduce your desire and ability to overeat.

Broccoli, frozen,
chopped boiled
Romaine
Lettuce
Kale,
cooked
Beef Short Loin,
Porterhouse Steak,
separable lean & fat,
1/8 “ fat, broiled
Beef short Loin,
Porterhouse Steak,
separable lean & fat,
1/4” fat, broiled
Calories 100 100 100 100 100
Weight (g) 357 (12.6oz) 588 (20.7oz) 358 (12.6oz) 34 (1.2oz) 30 (1.0oz)
Protein (g) 11.1 7.2 6.8 8.0 6.5
Fat (g) 0.4 1.8 1.4 7.4 7.7
Carbohydrate (g) 19.2 19.4 20.2 0 0
Fiber 10.8 12.4 7.2 0 0
Cholesterol 0 0 0 24.1 21.6
Calcium (mg) 118 194 258 2.7 2.4
Iron (mg) 2.2 5.7 3.2 0.9 0.8
Magnesium (mg) 46 82 64.4 7.8 6.0
Potassium (mg) 507 1453 816.2 109 76.5
Vitamin C (mg) 143 23.5 146.8 0 0
Thiamin (mg) 0.2 0.4 0.2 0 0
Riboflavin (mg) 0.3 0.4 0.3 0 0
Niacin (mg) 1.6 1.8 1.8 1.4 1.2
Vitamin B6 (mg) 0.5 0.4 0.5 0.1 0.1
Folate (mcg) 200 800 46.5 2.4 2.1
Vitamin A (IU) 3609 51253 48763 0 0
Vitamin K (mcg) 315 603 2924 0 0

Source: Data was obtained from Nutritionist Pro Nutritional Analysis Software, Version 4.7, Axxya Systems , Stafford TX, 2012.

Please note that 100 calories of steak is only about one ounce, which is not much meat to fill you up. More typically, 4 – 8 ounces is eaten, supplying too many calories and too much animal protein without the lifespan enhancing micronutrients. Bottom line—eat more greens and less meat to get more micronutrient bang per caloric buck and to suppress your calorie intake.